USAluminum specializes in Sunrooms, Screen Rooms, Screen Enclosures, Re-Screens and Repairs, Seamless Gutters, Patios, Porches, Fences, Railings, Decorative Screen Doors, Pavers and Concrete with best quality and Price Guaranteed for Florida Residents.

February 14th, 2012

Have a clear vision of the finished product before you begin.

5 Things Your Contractor Wishes You Knew:

US Aluminum Services wants to make sure  every homeowner has a clear vision of the finished product before you event begin with the project!

Planning a remodel is a big commitment that requires extensive research and resources. What can be a difficult, frustrating process doesn’t have to be. Save yourself some serious headaches by seeing a remodel from a contractor’s perspective. When it comes down to it, a good client is an educated one. Get to know these five things courtesy of the contractor:

1. The remodel starts with you.

Homeowners who are indecisive can be very frustrating for contractors. To make the process smoother, have a clear vision of the finished product before you begin. By establishing good lines of communication for your expectations, the process can be both enjoyable and successful.

2. Research is encouraged.

The quickest way to derail a remodeling venture is by not doing your homework. Avoid slowing the process and going over budget by thoroughly researching your project and contractor. Visit job sites, talk to client references or price construction materials to find the right fit for your remodel.

3. It’s a budget balancing act.

Don’t just cut out the pretty pictures — go through the planning process and know how much you’re willing to spend. Finding a balance between spending too much and spending too little will help you come up with a strategy you and your budget can tolerate.

4. Be realistic about timing.

Things that look simple on paper can be time-consuming and costly. From surprising mold underneath the bathroom floor to removing a wall in the kitchen, the key is to be flexible with your schedule. Provide a time frame for the project, but be realistic.

5. Micromanaging slows down the work.

The homeowner needs to be part of the process, but contractors caution against micromanaging. It will take longer to complete the project if the contractor is catering to constant homeowner hovering. Touch base with your contractor every other day to maintain open communication.

To read the full article click here

About US Aluminum Services, Corp

Founded in 2004, US Aluminum Services, Corp. is a fully insured and state certified construction company that complies with all Florida Codes for the construction industry. US Aluminum Services offers the best designed, best installed, and best backed warranty in the business. All services are executed to the exact specifications of our customer’s request. Our materials are top of the line, made exclusively to US Aluminum Service specifications by the top manufacturers in Florida. Their services include Florida screen rooms, patio and pool enclosures, sunrooms, architectural columns, pergolas, gutters, pavers, and fences. www.us-aluminum.com

January 13th, 2012

US Aluminum Services are having some amazing spring specials on sunrooms and screen rooms! Come see us this weekend at the Home & Garden Show – Booth #723 at the Orange County Convention Center!

December 1st, 2011

US Aluminum Services, Corp. is providing you with several steps on how to install gutters! You can also view these steps at thisoldhouse.com

Rain gutters are extremely important because without them, water would erode the soil around the foundation of your home as well as splash dirt up onto the siding. For Florida Residents, proper working rain gutters are a basic need because they often have to deal with hurricanes and tropical storms and if the gutters are not draining correctly, it can cause many other problems in and around their home.

Features and benefits of gutters:

- Stops small to large leaves

- Stops tree branches, pine needles, straw, and seeds

- Virtually invisible from the curbside

- Over 20 colors to choose from

Installing Gutters in 8 Steps:

Step 1- Snap Layout Lines: Mark the highest point of the gutter run on the fascia 1 ¼ inches below the metal drip-edge flashing (on the extra-wide fascia shown here, the gutter is lower down). At the other end of the fascia (or at the downspout location if there’s one in the middle of the run), mark the low end of the gutter run, keeping in mind that the slope should be approximately ½ inch for every 10 feet of run. Snap a chalk line between the two points (as shown).

Step 2 - Attach Fascia Brackets: Locate the rafter tails behind the fascia; they’re typically spaced 16 inches on center (look for telltale nail heads).  Make a mark at the chalk line on every other rafter tail. Bore a ⅛-inch-diameter pilot hole through the fascia and into the rafter tail at each mark. Fasten fascia brackets with ¼-inch stainless steel lag screws long enough to penetrate rafters 2 inches (as shown).

Step 3 – Saw Gutter To Length: Cut gutter section to length with hacksaw and aviation snips, or with a 12-inch power miter saw fitted with a carbide-tipped finish blade (as shown). If the gutter continues around a corner, cut the appropriate angle (typically 45 degrees) on that end. If the run requires two sections of gutter, overlap them by 8 inches and use 3/8-inch-long, self-tapping, stainless steel screws or pop rivets, in two rows of four each, to join them.

Step 4 – Attach End Caps: At the square-cut end of the gutter, attach a spherical end cap with aluminum pop rivets. (If the gutter doesn’t turn a corner, fasten an end cap to each end.) To do this, hold the end cap in place temporarily with a single sheet-metal screw, then drill a 1/8-inch-diameter hole and install one pop rivet (above). Remove the temporary screw and replace it with a rivet. To ensure a watertight joint, seal the rivets and the end-cap seam on the inside of the gutter with a high-quality siliconized caulk.

Step 5 – Cut Downspout Holes: Use a downspout outlet to mark the location of the downspout on the low end of the gutter. To do this, turn the gutter upside down and place the outlet on top. Drill a ¼-inch-diameter hole through the center of the circular outline. Turn the gutter over and cut the downspout hole using a 4-inch-diameter hole saw chucked into a drill (as shown).

Step 6 – Install Gutter: Lay the gutter into the brackets that you’ve lag-screwed to the fascia. Rotate the gutter upward until its back edge slips into the hooks at the top of the back of the brackets (as shown). Through the screw-mounting hole in each bracket, drill a 3/16-inch-diameter hole in the front edge of the gutter. Secure the gutter to the bracket with a 1-inch-long #8-32 stainless steel machine screw and flanged nut.

Step 7 – Form Strip-Miter Joint At Corner: Cover the joint between two lengths of gutter at each corner with a strip miter — a 3-inch-wide strip of aluminum. Wrap the aluminum strip tight around the underside of the gutter. Secure it with eight pop rivets or sheet- metal screws. Cut a triangular section from the top of the strip miter (as shown) with snips, and then fold down the two flaps around the top edge of the gutter. This joint can also be made more waterproof with the addition of a high-quality siliconized caulk.

Step 8 – Connect Downspout To Gutter: Secure the downspout outlet to the gutter with four pop rivets or screws. Screw a downspout elbow to the outlet tube protruding down from the gutter. Hold another elbow against the house and cut a piece of downspout to fit between the two elbows. Use needlenosed pliers to slightly crimp the elbow to fit into the downspout (as shown). Fasten the parts together with pop rivets or screws.

Below are some pictures of seamless gutters installed in the Central Florida Area by US Aluminum Services, Corp.

October 13th, 2011

US Aluminum Services, Corp. is providing you with several steps on how to plan and post a pergola! You can also view these steps at popularmechanics.com

Installing a Pergola in 7 Steps

A pergola is a unique architectural blend that places you both inside and out at the same time. A pergola can be used to define a passageway or frame a focal point in your yard.

Features and benefits of a pergola:

  • Pergolas Receives a Shade Factor of 40-60 Percent
  • Rain, Sun & Weather Resistant
  • Come in a variety of different colors

Step 1. A Toro Dingo’s 16-inch auger makes short work of straight, 40-inch-deep holes for footings, or whatever depth will reach below frost line in your climate. For drainage, pour and pack 4 inches of gravel into the holes before installing the posts.

Step 2. To lay out posthole locations, build a 2 x 8 frame. Its inside corners mark the four posts. Dig a small trench, level the frame, then remove it to dig the holes. Next, replace the frame, set the posts and fasten them to the sides of the frame so they’ll stay plumb.

Step 3. After fastening the posts to the frame, install 2 x 4 angle braces from the frame to the posts. These will keep the posts from twisting or warping before the rafters go up and lock the posts in place for backfilling. You can remove the braces later.

Step 4. Posthole depth varies. It’s best to install the posts long and trim them to final height, measuring from the frame upward. Finish the circular-saw cut with a handsaw, then install a cleat 6 inches down (inset) to hold the girders while fastening.

Step 5. Temporarily set the girders with deck screws above the cleats, then install the through-bolts in the girders and posts. Allow the girder to rise above the post an inch or so in case you decide to run wire for lights or power.

Step 6. Cut the rafter tails on the ground, then mark their 18-inch cantilevers against the posts. After wedging one end up top, walk the other end up the ladder. Toe-screw the rafters to the girders using a 3-inch deck screw.

Step 7. A 2 x 4 rafter stay atop the rafters every 24 inches adds the right detail while holding the rafters in place. Install stays over the girders first, then over the rafters. After two coats of tinted oil-based stain, add a layer of sod, then a table and chairs.

Below are some pictures of pergolas that Us Aluminum Services, Corp. has done in the Central Florida Area.

August 3rd, 2011


Adding a Pool Safety Fence around your pool is a good caution to take if you have children, pets or elderly around.

It provides  safety and adds charm to your swimming pool and deck!

US Aluminum Services is providing you with 6 Steps on how to add a Pool Safety Fence around your pool!. You can also view these steps at doityourself.com.

Tools and Equipment Needed

  • Garden hose or rope
  • Measuring tape
  • Chalk
  • Tape
  • Stick, 4 feet long
  • Waterproof marker
  • Safety glasses
  • Gloves
  • Drilling machine and cement drill bits
  • Pool fencing and plastic sleeves
  • Pool gate with spring latch

Step 1 – Measure Area and Purchase Appropriate Fencing

Arrange a garden hose or rope at least 2 to 3 feet from the edge of the pool to determine where you will install the safety fence. Also mark the opening for the gate with chalk, which usually opens on to the pool stairs.

Draw the hose or rope tight and measure it to give you an idea of how much fencing you need to purchase.

Purchase the type of fencing that will compliment the architectural design of your house along with providing you peace of mind and the assured safety. There are many types available in home improvement or hardware stores such as aluminum, steel, wrought iron and treated wood that are generally five or six feet high.

Step 2 – Cut Sticks

Take your 4-foot long stick and measure and cut a piece 3 feet long. This will be used to measure the distance between the fence sections. Measure and cut another stick 2 ½ inches long from the remaining piece, to measure the distance between each panel.

Step 3 – Mark Drilling Holes

Use a waterproof marker to mark the areas, using the 3-foot and 2 ½-inch sticks to provide appropriate spacing. Do this all around the pool. Make sure you measure and mark the area accurately because you will be drilling holes over them.

Step 4 – Prepare Drilling Machine

Make sure your drilling machine has a cement bit to drill holes into your deck. Measure the plastic sleeves that came with your fence material and measure, cut and install a piece of tape the same length on the drill bit where it meets the sleeve. This will allow you to drill the size of the sleeve, without going too deep.

Step 5 – Drill the Marked Area

Make sure you wear your protective eyewear and gloves, and begin drilling the holes on the marked spots. Clean away loose cement and insert the plastic sleeves into the holes, pushing them all the way down. These will hold the fencing poles, so make sure they are tightly fit in the hole.

Step 6 – Install Pool Fencing and Gate

Begin at the gate and insert poles into the sleeves. Pull the fencing material, which is usually steel mesh tight between them. Work your way around the pool to install the fencing.

Locate the openings in the top parts of the poles where you want to install your pool gate, and insert a spring latch, followed by the gate. This latch is a building requirement to ensure the gate closes by itself immediately after it is opened.

Below are a few pictures of finished jobs done in the Central Florida Area by US Aluminum Services:

July 29th, 2011

US Aluminum Services is providing you with 7 Steps on how to add a metal carport roof to your carport!

It is relatively easy even for novice do-it-yourselfers. You can also view these steps at doityourself.com.


Features of having a carport:

  • Custom Designed to complement the look and feel of your home.
  • Covers come in variety of sizes and styles.
  • Weather-Proof barrier protecting your patio or vehicle.
  • Maintenance Free
  • Crafted to never rust, warp, crack, rot, or become infested with insects.

Tools and Materials Required:

  • 25-foot measuring tape
  • Power drill and screwdriver bits
  • Claw hammer
  • Roof underlayment
  • Roofing nails
  • Roof waterproofing felt
  • 1-inch by 4-inch wood strips
  • Foam closure strips
  • Butyl tape sealant
  • Wall and rake flashing
  • Carport roof gutter
  • Aluminum roof sheathing panels
  • Jigsaw with metal cutting blade
  • Self tapping wood screws with rubber gaskets
  • 7/8 inch metal self-tapping screws
  • 2 assistants
  • 2 stepladders 10 feet high
  • Thick slashproof gloves

Step 1: Remove Existing Roof Covering

Remove all shingles, tar paper or other roof coverings. Check the roof waterproofing. If the waterproofing is intact and your carport has no leaks, you can apply the new metal roof over it. If the waterproofing has tears or holes, remove it.

Step 2: Check the Roof Underlayment

If the roof underlayment is solid and intact, install a new layer of waterproofing felt according to instructions. If the roof underlayment has holes or the wood is warped, remove the damaged sections and install new roof underlayment, then add the waterproofing felt on top.

Step 3: Measure to Purchase Metal Roof Sheathing and Flashing

For an aluminum or sheet steel roof, you will need to get flashing made of the same metal to prevent chemical corrosion of the roof sheathing. Measure the size of your roof and determine the number of metal roof panels you will need. Have them cut to size by the manufacturer. Most panels are 3 feet wide and come in lengths from 5 to 40 feet. Measure carefully at the roof edge to order the correct rake flashing to finish the roof.

Step 4: Install the Roof Flashing at the House Wall

Install roof flashing so it overlaps the wall of your house and under the waterproofing by 6 inches. Make a tight seal between the flashing and the waterproof felt to prevent leaks.

Step 5: Lay Wood Strips to Support the Metal Roof

Place and nail 1 x 4 wood strips at a right angle from the wall to the edge of the carport roof. These support the metal roof and keep wood and metal screws from penetrating the carport ceiling.

Step 6: Install the Metal Roof

You will need 2 or more assistants for this part of the task, as steel sheathing is very heavy. Aluminum sheathing is very flexible and can be pulled from your hands by a strong wind gust. Lift the panels one at a time to the roof and secure them to the underlayment with the self-tapping wood screws fitted with rubber gaskets. Each panel is secured to its neighbor with self-tapping galvanized metal screws. Trim the last metal panel to the correct width with the jigsaw as necessary.

Step 7: Install the Rake Flashing

At the edge of the roof, install the rake flashing. If you are putting in a roof gutter, the flashing must overlap the side of the gutter closest to the roof sheathing. Place foam closure strips over the upper edge of the rake flashing and seal with butyl tape sealant, applied in a continuous bead. Ensure the flashing face is square to the roof edge.

Below are a few pictures of finished jobs done in the Central Florida Area by US Aluminum Services:

July 20th, 2011

How to Install a Window

When windows are placed in the proper spot, they can catch the perfect view of outside and let in a lot of sunlight!

US Aluminum Services has provided you with 9 steps on how to successfully remove an old window and install a new one in its place! All supplies can be purchased at Home Depot or Lowe’s. You can also view these steps from DIY network.

Materials

  • double-paned window
  • wooden window sill
  • paint
  • trim molding
  • silicone
  • insulation
  • cedar shims

Tools

  • finish nailer
  • miter saw
  • circular saw
  • screw gun
  • hammer
  • pry bar

Step 1: Remove Window Trim and Casing

The first thing to do is to use a prybar to remove the window trim and jamb extension from around the old window. The jam extension is just a piece of wood that’s been ripped down and attached to the window jamb to bring it even with the wall.

Step 2: Remove Old Window/Guide Track

Unscrew the window from the jamb and remove it. Take care not to break the glass while removing. Many windows will be multiple window sashes with moving tracks on the side. Those types of windows may be easier to remove one sash at a time.

Step 3: Prep/Repair New Window Opening

With the window out of the wall, inspect the condition of the window jamb to make sure there is no structural damage. It’s not uncommon for an old window to leak, rotting out the jamb. If there is damage, you will have to replace or repair the damaged areas of the jamb before moving forward. Also, you will need to measure your rough opening to make sure that it can accommodate your new window. The rough opening should be 1/4” to 3/8” larger than the exterior dimensions of the new window.

Step 4: Inspect/Replace Window Stop

The window stop is a piece of wood ripped down and placed around the exterior side of the window jamb. The function of the stop is to prevent the window from sliding out of the opening. It literally stops the window from moving. It’s very likely that the original stop is still in useable condition, but if it is damaged, you may need to repair or replace this as well.

Step 5: Dry Fit Window

Before applying the silicone to the the window stop, dry fit the window to make sure there are no fitment issues. If you do have fitment issues, address them now and then dry fit the window again. When done properly the window should fit snugly into the opening. Do not move forward with the install until you are satisfied with the way the window fits in the opening.

Step 6: Install Window

The actual install of the window is very simple. First, run a bead of silicone on the inside edge of the window stop (Image 1) and then slide the window into place (Image 2). Place a level across the top of the window and press cedar shims between the bottom of the window frame and the jamb as necessary to get the window sitting level (Image 3). The window will usually come with its own hardware packet, typically consisting of four screws that will go through the sides of the unit to anchor it to the jamb. Two screws should be put into each side of the window, one near the top and the other near the bottom (Image 4). There will be pre-drilled holes in the window frame for the screws.

Step 7: Add Insulation

There may be gaps around the original window frame the wall studs, and this is the perfect opportunity to insulate those areas better. For larger gaps, cut pieces of roll insulation and pack them into the gaps. For harder to reach spots, you can use expanding spray insulation foam.

Step 8: Add Extension Jambs and Trim Molding

Pick a style of molding that fits your home’s decor and create a frame around the window. Measure the length of each piece and use a miter saw to cut the trim to the appropriate length. Make your cuts on 45-degree angles so the trim will fit together with a nice picture-frame look. Attach the trim to the wall with finish nails. You may also need to add thin strips of wood trim (a jamb extension, see Step 1) inside the original window frame to cover the gap between the new window and the drywall.

TIP: At first, use only enough nails to hold the trim to the wall until you’ve successfully lined up all four sides of the frame. Once you’ve achieved the proper fit and you’re sure the trim will not require additional adjustments to fit, you can go back and add more finish nails, every 6 to 8 inches. Any slight gaps in the corners can be filled in with silicone before painting.

Step 9: Paint and Add Finishing Touches

The final step is to finish off the window framing by filling any nail holes with stainable/paintable wood putty and painting or staining the trim moulding around the window for a finished look.

July 15th, 2011

If you are thinking about building a walkway or a pool deck in your yard, pavers are a great idea to use to complete the job! They will make your pool deck or walk way look beautiful!

US Aluminum Services has provided you with 10 steps in installing a screen door! All supplies can be purchased at Home Depot or Lowe’s. You can also view these steps from DIY network.

Features and Benefits of Having Pavers:

  • Belgard PaverSystems paver products
  • High Integrity Color
  • Slip & Skid resistance
  • Low Maintenance
  • Easy Paver Replacement
  • Hundreds of Shapes, Sizes, and Colors to choose from

Materials

  • concrete
  • masonry sand
  • pavers
  • cinderblocks
  • shovels
  • wheelbarrow
  • rubber mallet
  • straightedge
  • hammer
  • cold chisel
  • diamond edge wet saw
  • trowel
  • vibratory plate compactor

Tools

Step 1: Clear the Area

Before starting any excavation project, contact local utility companies to identify gas and water lines. Using shovels, wheelbarrows and good old-fashioned muscle, begin hauling out dirt and debris.

Step 2: Spread Crushed Concrete

Once dug to the right depth throughout the courtyard, fill the area up again. Start by spreading roughly two inches of crushed concrete evenly over the soil. The crushed concrete is an aggregate.

Step 3: Screed Sand

Lay out the conduit poles about two feet apart (Image 1). Since you will not be able to walk on the sand once it is screeded, work in small sections (Image 2).

Step 4: Lay Pavers

Lay the pavers down with the rough surface facing upward. This will give the courtyard more of a natural stone look. Place a straight edge along the length of the pavers just laid. By tapping gently with a rubber mallet, you are able to keep the pavers nice and flat.

Step 5: Continue Screeding and Laying Pavers

Continue screeding the sand bed one section at a time before laying the next area of pavers. Once laid, the pavers provide an excellent area to work without upsetting the newly screeded sand bed. Continue screeding and laying pavers, leaving the area for the fountain open.

Step 6: Lay the Fountain Foundation

Position four cinderblocks where the fountain base will sit, making sure they are level. These foundation blocks will help distribute the weight of the fountain and prevent uneven sinking or wobbling. Using a hammer and cold chisel, score the pavers along the line. If there are large areas where pavers need to be cut to size, a more modern technique can be used with a diamond blade wet saw.

Step 7: Add a Restraining Wall

Add a small DIY restraining wall along the flowerbeds burring the pavers in an upright position. This is an inexpensive, effective and attractive way to keep dirt and water from spilling over into the courtyard.

Step 8: Place the Fountain

After placing the fountain on its new foundation, add a row of pavers to serve as a small retaining wall for the plants.

Step 9: Spread Masonry Sand

Making sure to fill the spaces in between each paver, spread masonry sand across the entire surface. Leaving surplus sand across the top of the pavers helps cushion the surface when you use the plate compactor. The vibration of the plate compactor also helps to fill the joints in between pavers.

Step 10: Re-Sweep the Area

Finally, re-sweep the surface with the remaining dry sand. This process may have to be repeated over the new few days as the sand settles and rain compacts it.

Below are a few pictures of finished jobs done in the Central Florida Area by US Aluminum Services:

July 8th, 2011

A Porch is a great place for you and your family to sit and relax outside!

With a few steps, you can build your porch today!

A porch can be built in the front or back of your home and come in all different sizes!

US Aluminum Services has provided you with 10 steps in installing your very own porch! All supplies can be purchased at Home Depot or Lowe’s. You can also view these steps from HGTV.com

Materials and Tools:

  • one 4x4x8 pressure-treated post
  • two post mounts $2.00 $4.00
  • two J-bolt assemblies
  • box 8D nails
  • six 2x8x10 pressure-treated boards
  • five joist hangers
  • box joist hanger nails
  • 183-square-feet 3/4-inch pine tongue-and-groove flooring
  • 12 cedar 2x4x8 boards
  • one gallon paint to match house trim
  • 5-cubic yards mulch
  • plants
  • one 4-foot Sonotube concrete form
  • 10 bags quickset concrete
  • four 4-inch lag bolts
  • four lag bolt shields
  • masonry bit for lag bolt shields
  • grinder with metal cut-off wheel
  • layout string line
  • level
  • measuring tape
  • pencil
  • post hole diggers
  • power miter box
  • rakes
  • safety glasses
  • shovels

Steps:

1. Unscrew the handrails from the house and use a grinder to cut off the posts in the concrete.

2. Layout the new porch using string line tied to stakes in the ground. Place the center of the footings at the outside corners for the new porch.

3. The porch requires two footing to support the outer edge of the new porch. The inner edge will be bolted to the house. Dig the holes 24-inches deep by 10 to 12-inches in diameter. Drop in a 24-inch section of Sonotube and level. Pack dirt around the perimeter to hold in place.

4. Mix the concrete and fill the Sonotubes to the top. Scrape off excess and level it with the top of the tube. Press a J-bolt into the center of the tube and let dry. After the concrete sets, bolt the post brackets to the J-bolt.

5. Begin bolting the 2×8 to the wall of the house with lag bolts. Make sure the board is level, drill and mark the holes. Tighten a lag bolt through each pre-drilled hole into the band-board of the house. Set the board 1-inch below the threshold of the existing door.

6. Secure the end bands from the house ledger to the footing. Run the band board out to the footer and check to make sure it’s level. Measure the height of the 4×4 post and cut it in. Do the same on the other end.

7. Add the outer joist and once the perimeter is in place check to make sure it’s square. If it is, add the middle joists on 16-inch centers. Once nailed in place, add the joist hangers to the end of each board. Notch the joists over the existing concrete porch, if necessary.

8. Install the tongue-and-groove pine starting at the outside edge and working towards the house. This places the cut board against the house where it will not be visible.

9. If you’re using pine flooring, prime very surface of every board. You will not be able to get to the underside of the deck once it?s built, so it’s important to prime everything before assembly.

10. Build the planter by cutting the pine flooring to 32-inch and assemble it into an 18-inch square box, with the boards running vertically. Build a shelf of 1/2-inch pressure-treated plywood to hold the plants.

Below are a couple of  US Aluminum Services, Corp. porch’s that have been installed in the Central Florida Area:

July 1st, 2011

US Aluminum Services, Corp of Orlando,Florida has joined up with Winter Park Construction in the West Orlando Habitat for Humanity Home at Last 2 Project, building a home for another disable veteran and his family, the family that was chosen was the Griffin Family from Oakland, Florida. The veteran Benjamin Griffin, 24, is a 5 year US Army Veteran who was in Iraq when we was brutally injured in an IED explosion, which has now left him in a wheelchair.

US Aluminum Services, Corp. has donated their services in helping build the Griffin family their dream home. US Aluminum Services, Corp. donated and installed a pool enclosure and lanai for their porch/patio for the Griffin Family home, with the help from getting their materials from their suppliers; Eagle Metal Aluminum and Phifer‘s BetterVue Screen.

Pictures of the Enclosure are found below:

Lanai for their Porch, Used BetterVue Screen

You can visit www.us-aluminum.com to learn more