USAluminum specializes in Sunrooms, Screen Rooms, Screen Enclosures, Re-Screens and Repairs, Seamless Gutters, Patios, Porches, Fences, Railings, Decorative Screen Doors, Pavers and Concrete with best quality and Price Guaranteed for Florida Residents.

December 1st, 2011

US Aluminum Services, Corp. is providing you with several steps on how to install gutters! You can also view these steps at thisoldhouse.com

Rain gutters are extremely important because without them, water would erode the soil around the foundation of your home as well as splash dirt up onto the siding. For Florida Residents, proper working rain gutters are a basic need because they often have to deal with hurricanes and tropical storms and if the gutters are not draining correctly, it can cause many other problems in and around their home.

Features and benefits of gutters:

- Stops small to large leaves

- Stops tree branches, pine needles, straw, and seeds

- Virtually invisible from the curbside

- Over 20 colors to choose from

Installing Gutters in 8 Steps:

Step 1- Snap Layout Lines: Mark the highest point of the gutter run on the fascia 1 ¼ inches below the metal drip-edge flashing (on the extra-wide fascia shown here, the gutter is lower down). At the other end of the fascia (or at the downspout location if there’s one in the middle of the run), mark the low end of the gutter run, keeping in mind that the slope should be approximately ½ inch for every 10 feet of run. Snap a chalk line between the two points (as shown).

Step 2 - Attach Fascia Brackets: Locate the rafter tails behind the fascia; they’re typically spaced 16 inches on center (look for telltale nail heads).  Make a mark at the chalk line on every other rafter tail. Bore a ⅛-inch-diameter pilot hole through the fascia and into the rafter tail at each mark. Fasten fascia brackets with ¼-inch stainless steel lag screws long enough to penetrate rafters 2 inches (as shown).

Step 3 – Saw Gutter To Length: Cut gutter section to length with hacksaw and aviation snips, or with a 12-inch power miter saw fitted with a carbide-tipped finish blade (as shown). If the gutter continues around a corner, cut the appropriate angle (typically 45 degrees) on that end. If the run requires two sections of gutter, overlap them by 8 inches and use 3/8-inch-long, self-tapping, stainless steel screws or pop rivets, in two rows of four each, to join them.

Step 4 – Attach End Caps: At the square-cut end of the gutter, attach a spherical end cap with aluminum pop rivets. (If the gutter doesn’t turn a corner, fasten an end cap to each end.) To do this, hold the end cap in place temporarily with a single sheet-metal screw, then drill a 1/8-inch-diameter hole and install one pop rivet (above). Remove the temporary screw and replace it with a rivet. To ensure a watertight joint, seal the rivets and the end-cap seam on the inside of the gutter with a high-quality siliconized caulk.

Step 5 – Cut Downspout Holes: Use a downspout outlet to mark the location of the downspout on the low end of the gutter. To do this, turn the gutter upside down and place the outlet on top. Drill a ¼-inch-diameter hole through the center of the circular outline. Turn the gutter over and cut the downspout hole using a 4-inch-diameter hole saw chucked into a drill (as shown).

Step 6 – Install Gutter: Lay the gutter into the brackets that you’ve lag-screwed to the fascia. Rotate the gutter upward until its back edge slips into the hooks at the top of the back of the brackets (as shown). Through the screw-mounting hole in each bracket, drill a 3/16-inch-diameter hole in the front edge of the gutter. Secure the gutter to the bracket with a 1-inch-long #8-32 stainless steel machine screw and flanged nut.

Step 7 – Form Strip-Miter Joint At Corner: Cover the joint between two lengths of gutter at each corner with a strip miter — a 3-inch-wide strip of aluminum. Wrap the aluminum strip tight around the underside of the gutter. Secure it with eight pop rivets or sheet- metal screws. Cut a triangular section from the top of the strip miter (as shown) with snips, and then fold down the two flaps around the top edge of the gutter. This joint can also be made more waterproof with the addition of a high-quality siliconized caulk.

Step 8 – Connect Downspout To Gutter: Secure the downspout outlet to the gutter with four pop rivets or screws. Screw a downspout elbow to the outlet tube protruding down from the gutter. Hold another elbow against the house and cut a piece of downspout to fit between the two elbows. Use needlenosed pliers to slightly crimp the elbow to fit into the downspout (as shown). Fasten the parts together with pop rivets or screws.

Below are some pictures of seamless gutters installed in the Central Florida Area by US Aluminum Services, Corp.

August 3rd, 2011


Adding a Pool Safety Fence around your pool is a good caution to take if you have children, pets or elderly around.

It provides  safety and adds charm to your swimming pool and deck!

US Aluminum Services is providing you with 6 Steps on how to add a Pool Safety Fence around your pool!. You can also view these steps at doityourself.com.

Tools and Equipment Needed

  • Garden hose or rope
  • Measuring tape
  • Chalk
  • Tape
  • Stick, 4 feet long
  • Waterproof marker
  • Safety glasses
  • Gloves
  • Drilling machine and cement drill bits
  • Pool fencing and plastic sleeves
  • Pool gate with spring latch

Step 1 – Measure Area and Purchase Appropriate Fencing

Arrange a garden hose or rope at least 2 to 3 feet from the edge of the pool to determine where you will install the safety fence. Also mark the opening for the gate with chalk, which usually opens on to the pool stairs.

Draw the hose or rope tight and measure it to give you an idea of how much fencing you need to purchase.

Purchase the type of fencing that will compliment the architectural design of your house along with providing you peace of mind and the assured safety. There are many types available in home improvement or hardware stores such as aluminum, steel, wrought iron and treated wood that are generally five or six feet high.

Step 2 – Cut Sticks

Take your 4-foot long stick and measure and cut a piece 3 feet long. This will be used to measure the distance between the fence sections. Measure and cut another stick 2 ½ inches long from the remaining piece, to measure the distance between each panel.

Step 3 – Mark Drilling Holes

Use a waterproof marker to mark the areas, using the 3-foot and 2 ½-inch sticks to provide appropriate spacing. Do this all around the pool. Make sure you measure and mark the area accurately because you will be drilling holes over them.

Step 4 – Prepare Drilling Machine

Make sure your drilling machine has a cement bit to drill holes into your deck. Measure the plastic sleeves that came with your fence material and measure, cut and install a piece of tape the same length on the drill bit where it meets the sleeve. This will allow you to drill the size of the sleeve, without going too deep.

Step 5 – Drill the Marked Area

Make sure you wear your protective eyewear and gloves, and begin drilling the holes on the marked spots. Clean away loose cement and insert the plastic sleeves into the holes, pushing them all the way down. These will hold the fencing poles, so make sure they are tightly fit in the hole.

Step 6 – Install Pool Fencing and Gate

Begin at the gate and insert poles into the sleeves. Pull the fencing material, which is usually steel mesh tight between them. Work your way around the pool to install the fencing.

Locate the openings in the top parts of the poles where you want to install your pool gate, and insert a spring latch, followed by the gate. This latch is a building requirement to ensure the gate closes by itself immediately after it is opened.

Below are a few pictures of finished jobs done in the Central Florida Area by US Aluminum Services:

July 20th, 2011

How to Install a Window

When windows are placed in the proper spot, they can catch the perfect view of outside and let in a lot of sunlight!

US Aluminum Services has provided you with 9 steps on how to successfully remove an old window and install a new one in its place! All supplies can be purchased at Home Depot or Lowe’s. You can also view these steps from DIY network.

Materials

  • double-paned window
  • wooden window sill
  • paint
  • trim molding
  • silicone
  • insulation
  • cedar shims

Tools

  • finish nailer
  • miter saw
  • circular saw
  • screw gun
  • hammer
  • pry bar

Step 1: Remove Window Trim and Casing

The first thing to do is to use a prybar to remove the window trim and jamb extension from around the old window. The jam extension is just a piece of wood that’s been ripped down and attached to the window jamb to bring it even with the wall.

Step 2: Remove Old Window/Guide Track

Unscrew the window from the jamb and remove it. Take care not to break the glass while removing. Many windows will be multiple window sashes with moving tracks on the side. Those types of windows may be easier to remove one sash at a time.

Step 3: Prep/Repair New Window Opening

With the window out of the wall, inspect the condition of the window jamb to make sure there is no structural damage. It’s not uncommon for an old window to leak, rotting out the jamb. If there is damage, you will have to replace or repair the damaged areas of the jamb before moving forward. Also, you will need to measure your rough opening to make sure that it can accommodate your new window. The rough opening should be 1/4” to 3/8” larger than the exterior dimensions of the new window.

Step 4: Inspect/Replace Window Stop

The window stop is a piece of wood ripped down and placed around the exterior side of the window jamb. The function of the stop is to prevent the window from sliding out of the opening. It literally stops the window from moving. It’s very likely that the original stop is still in useable condition, but if it is damaged, you may need to repair or replace this as well.

Step 5: Dry Fit Window

Before applying the silicone to the the window stop, dry fit the window to make sure there are no fitment issues. If you do have fitment issues, address them now and then dry fit the window again. When done properly the window should fit snugly into the opening. Do not move forward with the install until you are satisfied with the way the window fits in the opening.

Step 6: Install Window

The actual install of the window is very simple. First, run a bead of silicone on the inside edge of the window stop (Image 1) and then slide the window into place (Image 2). Place a level across the top of the window and press cedar shims between the bottom of the window frame and the jamb as necessary to get the window sitting level (Image 3). The window will usually come with its own hardware packet, typically consisting of four screws that will go through the sides of the unit to anchor it to the jamb. Two screws should be put into each side of the window, one near the top and the other near the bottom (Image 4). There will be pre-drilled holes in the window frame for the screws.

Step 7: Add Insulation

There may be gaps around the original window frame the wall studs, and this is the perfect opportunity to insulate those areas better. For larger gaps, cut pieces of roll insulation and pack them into the gaps. For harder to reach spots, you can use expanding spray insulation foam.

Step 8: Add Extension Jambs and Trim Molding

Pick a style of molding that fits your home’s decor and create a frame around the window. Measure the length of each piece and use a miter saw to cut the trim to the appropriate length. Make your cuts on 45-degree angles so the trim will fit together with a nice picture-frame look. Attach the trim to the wall with finish nails. You may also need to add thin strips of wood trim (a jamb extension, see Step 1) inside the original window frame to cover the gap between the new window and the drywall.

TIP: At first, use only enough nails to hold the trim to the wall until you’ve successfully lined up all four sides of the frame. Once you’ve achieved the proper fit and you’re sure the trim will not require additional adjustments to fit, you can go back and add more finish nails, every 6 to 8 inches. Any slight gaps in the corners can be filled in with silicone before painting.

Step 9: Paint and Add Finishing Touches

The final step is to finish off the window framing by filling any nail holes with stainable/paintable wood putty and painting or staining the trim moulding around the window for a finished look.

March 25th, 2011

March 21, 2011 US Aluminum Services, Corp build a Butterfly Enclosure for River Bend Nature Center’s Ruby N. Priddy Butterfly and Nature Conservatory, in Wichita Falls, Texas, right near the famous Lucy Park.

The Ruby N. Priddy Butterfly and Nature Conservatory is a one-of-a-kind, state-of-the-art, 7,000 sq. ft. glass structure. It is stocked with native butterflies and landscaped with prairie grasses, trees, shrubs, and wildflowers of the Rolling Plains. US Aluminum Services, Corp built a butterfly enclosure inside the 7,000 sq. ft. glass structure.

River Bend Nature Centerhas over 17 acres of bottom land forest and wetlands. Come on out and  and see if you can spot native birds such as cardinals, blue jays, woodpeckers, mockingbirds, robins, wrens, and red winged black birds. We also have families of skunks, grey fox, raccoons, opposums, and so much more!

US Aluminum Services, Corp. is known in the construction industry for their number of services; pool enclosures, screen rooms, sunrooms, patio enclosures, fences & railings, screen enclosures, porches & lanais, pergolas & lattice, concrete & paversand rescreens in the orlando, winter park, lake mary, sanford, kissimmee, lakeland, tampa, winter haven, jacksonville, clermont, winter garden, windermere area.

Built by US Aluminum Services, Corp. from Orlando, Florida

 Butterfly Enclosure in River Bend Nature Center

 

To view more pictures of the butterfly enclosure visit: http://www.flickr.com/photos/usaluminum/

January 21st, 2011

Come see US Aluminum Services at the  Tampa Bay Home Show at Tropicana Field this weekend! The show is from January 21- 23, 2011. It is FREE Admission & FREE Parking! We will be presenting our services, which include, Screen Rooms, Sunrooms, Pool Enclosures, Patio & Porches, Vinyl & Acrylic Rooms, Pergolas & Carports, Fences & Railings and more, to the Tampa, Clearwater, Lakeland, and Plant City homeowners!

At the show will feature hundreds of area home specialists – all in one location. Everything from furniture to decorating ideas to landscaping to remodeling to interior design, and the list goes on. See the latest in  designs and the hottest fashions in creating your very own backyard retreat.

Don’t miss this grand opportunity to meet with the area’s top home improvement experts! They’re ready to meet you with great demonstrations, giveaways, tips and so much more. Whether you’re looking for new home ideas or just looking for a few creative ideas to dress up your current residence…the Home Show is the place to be!

 To visit US Aluminum Services at this Home Show, the address is 1 Tropicana Dr, St. Petersburg, FL 33705.

Booth # 257 at the Tampa Bay Home Show